Standard for paying an employee when the last two days of notice are a holiday

2018-08-07 19:33:04

We have a salaried employee that has been with the company for 8 months. The employee gave two weeks notice and the last two days of that notice are typically a paid holiday (US Thanksgiving, Thursday/Friday). The employee has already used their automatic vacation days.

Is there a precedent or advice on paying that employee for those holiday days?

We're a small company that has never experienced this before, and this is our first employee that hasn't stayed at least 3 years.

Update: Thanks all, we're paying for the two days. In the future, we may institute a policy for employees that fit this very rare scenario.

Advice: Pay the two days. The amount of money that represents is likely to be trivial compared to any bad feedback your other employees hear about.

Every interaction you have with your employees is a way to show exactly what you think of them. If you are going to try and nickel and dime a paycheck then that sets a very bad precedent.

Do you have

  • Advice: Pay the two days. The amount of money that represents is likely to be trivial compared to any bad feedback your other employees hear about.

    Every interaction you have with your employees is a way to show exactly what you think of them. If you are going to try and nickel and dime a paycheck then that sets a very bad precedent.

    Do you have to legally pay for it? That answer is going to depend on your employee handbook and state laws. So you'll have to consult a lawyer on it. However, from a good employer perspective you really don't want to quibble over something so small.

    2018-08-07 19:57:30
  • The time to argue this is when the resignation letter was submitted and the date agreed on. If you did not change the date to the day before the holiday at that time, you should pay for those days. As it happens this is exactly what happened when I resigned from a job once. They didn't notice at the time I submitted my resignation that my last day was a holiday and their HR insisted they pay me for it.

    State laws and country laws may vary on what is legal, but if you accept the resignation letter without changing the final date, I think you have a moral obligation to pay up until that date. Two days pay may be trivial to a senior manager, but at lower levels of the organization, you could be materially harming this person. Do the right thing and pay him. Next time don't accept the resignation date on a holiday if it bothers you.

    2018-08-07 20:46:37
  • In the United States you generally as an employer are not required to keep an employee during their notice period. You may have a contract or union regulations that might require keeping them for the two weeks, but in an at-will work situation you can stop paying them the moment they tell you they are leaving.

    Generally companies allow the employee to stay so that they can turn over their knowledge to their replacement. They also like to keep paying them to foster good will. Both sides are generally not interested in burning bridges.

    An experienced employee would realize that vacations, holidays, insurance, sick leave and floating holidays can be an issue and would want to understand the rules prior to resigning. As an employer you need to set these guidelines in writing in an employee handbook for the next time.

    The two days labor for this one employee may be the price of learning for the company. You need to decide if the bad feelings from this employee are worth the risk.

    Y

    2018-08-07 21:03:39