What is the significance of the FBI source saying 'John' Haldeman?

2018-04-25 08:36:02

In All the President's Men, as I understood it, Woodward and Bernstein had already established that "someone high up in the WhiteHouse" was the fifth controller of the slush fund.

And then they concluded that "the fifth controller was 'Haldeman'".

And then they talked to their FBI informant to get confirmation, which they get, but Woodward notices that the FBI source says specifically 'John' Haldeman, and acts like this is a big deal, or new information, or in some way significant.

There's no indication in the film or in some brief wikipedia browsing that there were multiple Haldemans in the government, let alone in the WhiteHouse, let alone "high-up in the White House" so why is this a big deal?

This issue is the reference to John Haldeman which is not how the complicit Haldeman was referred to...

As their editor said

BRADLEE

--well shit, we oughtta be tense--

we're about to accuse Mr. H

  • This issue is the reference to John Haldeman which is not how the complicit Haldeman was referred to...

    As their editor said

    BRADLEE

    --well shit, we oughtta be tense--

    we're about to accuse Mr. Haldeman

    who only happens to be the second

    most important man in America of

    conducting a criminal conspiracy

    from inside the White House--

    (beat)

    --it would be nice if we were right--

    Harry Robbins "Bob" Haldeman (October 27, 1926 – November 12, 1993) was an American political aide and businessman, best known for his service as White House Chief of Staff to President Richard Nixon and his consequent involvement in the Watergate Affair.

    Haldeman was one of many key figures in the Watergate scandal. The unexplained 18½-minute gap in Nixon's Oval Office recordings occurred during

    2018-04-25 08:56:20